EXHIBITS

Coming Soon

Saturday, September 12, 2015–Sunday, September 13, 2015

Wednesday, September 16–Sunday, September 20, 2015

Wednesday, September 23–Sunday, September 27, 2015

Grace Hudson Museum “Estate” Sale and Ukiah Arts Community White Elephant Sale

img white elephantThis fundraiser to construct new portable display walls for Museum exhibitions will
offer art, jewelry, books, collectibles, and more for sale–gathered from items donated expressly for Museum support. Community arts organizations and artists will also offer their “white elephant” treasures for sale. Come often! Merchandise will change daily. While you're at it, check out changes around the Museum as we begin Construction Phase I in preparation for our park remodel.


Current Exhibit

Modern Twist:
Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art

May 30–August 30, 2015

img mimura chikuho hope detailAn exciting international exhibition, Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art features the work of professional bamboo artists living in Japan, whose evocative, sensual, and sculptural pieces explore innovations in bamboo art since the mid-twentieth century. The artworks were chosen by Dr. Andreas Marks, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, from the collections of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, California. It
was organized to travel by International Arts and Artists, Washington, D.C.
Mimura Chickuhō, Hope (Detail), 2004. Bamboo
(madake), rattan, lacquer. Photo by Susan Einstein.

To more closely tie Modern Twist to our collections and mission, at the Grace Hudson Museum we have added 12 Pomo baskets to accompany the 38 Japanese art pieces on display. Taken from our own holdings, and those of other lenders, the Pomo baskets provide interesting similarities and contrasts to their Japanese counterparts. Both basketry traditions are world famous, and mastering them requires decades of meticulous practice in harvesting and preparing native plant materials, and in constructing finished pieces. Modern Twist features examples of both Japanese and Pomo pieces by master weavers that together span over one hundred years of textile arts. 

img nagakura kenichi circle


img uematsu chikuyu ascending heaven



(Left) Nagakura Ken'ichi, Circle, 1990. Bamboo (madake), lacquer, powdered polishing stone, and clay. Photo by Mochizuki Akira.
(Right) Uematsu Chicuyū, Ascending to Heaven, 2007. Bamboo (madake) and rattan. Photo by Susan Einstein.

Bamboo is a quintessential part of Japanese life, and its emergence as a sculptural art form has religious and cultural roots. The Japanese have used this extraordinarily strong and flexible grass for centuries–for everything from functional objects to ceremonial baskets, and for the vases, tea scoops, ladles and whisks that serve an important place in the Japanese traditions of flower arranging (ikebana) and tea gatherings (chanoyu and senchadō). It is a challenging medium, with less than 100 professional bamboo artists in Japan today.

Modern Twist brings 17 of these artists to North American audiences, including two men deemed “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese government in recognition of the excellence of their work. These National Treasures–Katsushiro Sōhō and Fujinuma Noboru–are joined by visionary artists Matsumoto Hafū, Honma Hideaki, Ueno Masao, Uematsu Chikuyū, Nagakura Ken’ichi, Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Tanabe Yōta, Tanabe Shōchiku III, Tanioka Shigeo, Tanioka Aiko, Honda Shōryū, Mimura Chikuhō, Nakatomi Hajime, Sugiura Noriyoshi, and Yonezawa Jirō.

img tanabe chikuunsai iii-squares and circles

img jenny-tray







(Left) Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Squares and Circles, 2005. Bamboo (yadake), rattan, lacquer. Photo © Forrest Cavale.
(Right) Jenny Jackson, Pomo Indian Feast Tray, circa 1885. Willow shoots, sedge roots, bracken fern roots.

img bamboo exhibit


 img daen no kiseki rotation

(Left) Grace Hudson Museum Main Gallery, featuring Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art
(Right) Ueno Masao, Rotation of Ellipse Makes Two Transparent Drums, 2004. Bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer,
and gold powder. Photo by Susan Einstein.

Don’t miss this rare opportunity at the Grace Hudson Museum to experience groundbreaking levels of conceptual, technical, and artistic ingenuity both in bamboo art, and in the striking examples of our own
local Pomo basketry.

The exhibition was generously supported by the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Nomura Foundation, Japan Foundation,
Los Angeles, and the Snider Family Fund.

iaa-fullcolorimg ccjac

Exhibits

The Grace Hudson Museum has four exhibit galleries; three house permanent collections devoted to Grace Hudson's art; her family; and Pomo basketry. The fourth gallery is for the display of changing exhibits with a rotating emphasis on art, history, and anthropology. Changing exhibits generally are installed for three to four months. The Sun House, the Hudsons' historic Craftsman Home, is also available for tours.

Exhibition Schedule


Join us for a variety of fun events and exhibits during Construction Phase I of our
Park Remodel Project this fall!


 Saturday, September 12, 2015–Sunday, September 13, 2015

Wednesday, September 16–Sunday, September 20, 2015

Wednesday, September 23–Sunday, September 27, 2015

Grace Hudson Museum “Estate” Sale and Ukiah Arts Community White Elephant Sale

img white elephantThis fundraiser to construct new portable display walls for Museum exhibitions will
offer art, jewelry, collectibles, and more for sale–gathered from items donated expressly for Museum support. Community arts organizations and artists will also offer their “white elephant” treasures for sale. Come often! Merchandise will change daily. While you're at it, check out changes around the Museum as we begin Construction Phase I in preparation for our park remodel.


Thursday, October 1, 2015–Sunday, November 1, 2015

Grace Hudson: Painter of the Pomo People
AT THE CLOVERDALE HISTORY CENTER AND MUSEUM, Cloverdale, California

img 18382b grace

 

Visit our neighbors in history to the south! This Sonoma County
venue will present selections from, and additions to, a traveling
show originally appearing at St. Mary's College Museum of Art
in Moraga, California in the fall of 2014. Organized by the
Grace Hudson Museum, this exhibit provides an overview of
painter Grace Hudson's career.

 

 


Grace Hudson, c. 1897. Photo by A.O. Carpenter.
Collection of the Grace Hudson Museum & Sun House.


 Friday, October 2, 2015–Sunday, November 1, 2015

Mendocino Quilt Artists: A Fiber Perspective

img la serenata ann horton
In honor of the 5th annual county-wide celebration of American Craft Week, this month-long exhibit highlights the striking contemporary art quilts of the Mendocino Quilt Artists group: Deanna Apfel, Holly Brackmann, Laura Fogg, Renee Gannon, Vicky Groom, Ann Horton, Leila Kazimi, Betty Lacy, Dede Ledford, Mary Ann Michelsen, Joyce Patterson, and Marilyn Simpson. These local artists and residents demonstrate through their colorful, thought provoking, and technically impressive quilts, that craft is alive and well in Mendocino County.

Ann Horton, La Serenata.


Saturday, November 7, 2015–Sunday, January 10, 2016

 Gold Fever! Untold Stories of the California Gold Rush

img miners near nevada city


This exhibit reveals the history of California from before the fateful discovery of gold in the American River, through the frenzied rush to the gold fields overland and by sea. The experience of vigilante justice, life in the rowdy gold camps, Gold Rush-era commerce and farming, and the shaping of California's future are all explored. This panel exhibit with historic photographs will be supplemented at the Grace Hudson Museum by Gold Rush-era artifacts from the Carpenter Family collections. Traveled through Exhibit Envoy, this show was originally developed by the California Council for the Humanities in collaboration with the Oakland Museum of California.

Miners Near Nevada City, 1852. Photographer Unknown.
Collection of the California State Library.


Thursday, November 12, 2015–Sunday, March 6, 2016

Days of Grace: California Artist Grace Hudson in Hawaii
AT THE HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART, Honolulu, Hawaii

img optimized emma-square


Originally organized by the Grace Hudson Museum, Days of Grace travels to Honolulu to introduce new audiences to Grace Hudson and the Hawaiian work she produced during her transformative year in the Islands in 1901. Reconfigured to fit the space at the Honolulu Museum of Art, and to take advantage of its collections, the exhibit will focus on Grace, while a companion exhibit discusses other women artists active in Hawaii c. 1900-1950.


Emma Square
, 1901, by Grace Hudson.
Collection of George Weatherston.


Permanent Exhibits

Permanent exhibits on Grace Hudson's life, family, and professional work, and on Pomo basketry and culture, are available for viewing during regular Museum hours. The Sun House, the Hudsons' 1911 Craftsman home can be toured with Museum docents. See Sun House Tours for more information.

Hart Gallery

The Ivan B. and Elvira Hart Gallery houses a permanent exhibition dedicated to the artistic career of Grace Carpenter Hudson. Accompanied by text and photo panels giving extensive information about each phase and aspect of Grace's professional development, the gallery features numerous oils, watercolors, pen and ink drawings, charcoal, conte crayon, and graphite drawings, and mixed media works. Hudson's personal life is documented further in the Norma & Evert Person Gallery.

image new hart gallery

Person Gallery

img person galThe Norma and Evert Person Gallery features a permanent exhibit of informative text panels, photographs, textiles, and objects that interpret the history, and celebrate the legacy, of the memorable Carpenter-Hudson family. Organized by generations, each section of the gallery introduces the viewer to members of Grace Carpenter Hudson's illustrious family through descriptions of their lives, and displays of their belongings. Grace's own section expands upon her personal life, while her professional career is highlighted in the Ivan B. and Elvira Hart Gallery.


 

Stone Gallery

"stone gallery" "pomo baskets"The J. Ralph and Lois Stone Gallery features a long-term exhibition showcasing Pomo baskety masterpieces woven between 1860-2003. The baskets come from the collections of the Grace Hudson Museum, other private institutions with significant ethnographic holdings, and private collections. Informative text panels explain the steps taken in cultivating, harvesting, and processing materials for basketmaking. Panels also discuss the history of Pomo basketweaving, and the forms and functions of various basket types.

The Sun House

A sunny day at The Sun House, Grace Hudson's historic home in Ukiah, California.The Sun House, a 1911 redwood Craftsman bungalow home, is situated immediately in front of the Museum and is available for tours. Grace and John Hudson, its owners, together with architect George Wilcox, set out to build a functional, custom Craftsman-style home scaled to the Hudsons' needs. Fairly modest in size, it nonetheless accommodated Grace's prodigious artistic output and John's sizeable ethnographic collections. Keeping in mind the Arts and Crafts goal of uniting designer and craftsperson, the Hudsons actively collaborated with Wilcox on the design of the house, while adding their own creative touches. These include the pink tulips that Grace stenciled on the bedroom walls, the distinctive hat rack built by John Hudson in the entryway, and the unusual pendant lighting fixtures throughout the home. As was often the case in Craftsman dwellings, the architect became the furniture maker as well, when Wilcox designed and built the beautiful sideboard in the dining room that he presented to the Hudsons as a housewarming present. It is believed they moved into the Sun House around New Year's Day, 1912.

While these personal touches make the Sun House unique (in keeping with the Arts and Crafts spirit), it also features many typical Craftsman details. The sloping gabled roof with overhang, the sleeping porch, the use of natural redwood and stone, the front veranda, board-and-batten walls, built-in cabinetry and window seats, curio shelves above the doorways, "honest" materials (such as burlap and monks cloth wall coverings), exposed timbers, and the home's overall sense of simplicity, are all classic Craftsman elements.

Though George Wilcox designed several other Craftsman homes in Ukiah, and a scattering of other Craftsman bungalows exist in the town, the Sun House remains its most famous example. This is in good part due, of course, to its distinctive inhabitants. Taken together, the Hudsons and the Sun House are the embodiment of Arts and Crafts ideals, and leave a local legacy of an international movement.

Modern Twist

Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art

May 30–August 30, 2015

img mimura chikuho hope detailAn exciting international exhibition, Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art featured the work of professional bamboo artists living in Japan, whose evocative, sensual, and sculptural pieces explore innovations in bamboo art since the mid-twentieth century. The artworks were chosen by Dr. Andreas Marks, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, from the collections of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, California. It was traveled by International Arts and Artists, Washington, D.C.


Mimura Chickuhō
, Hope (Detail), 2004. Bamboo
(madake), rattan, lacquer. Photo by Susan Einstein.

To more closely tie Modern Twist to our collections and mission, at the Grace Hudson Museum we added 12 Pomo baskets to accompany the 38 Japanese art pieces on display. Taken from our own holdings, and those of other lenders, the Pomo baskets provide interesting similarities and contrasts to their Japanese counterparts. Both basketry traditions are world famous, and mastering them requires decades of meticulous practice in harvesting and preparing native plant materials, and in constructing finished pieces. Modern Twist featured examples of both Japanese and Pomo pieces by master weavers that together span over one hundred years of textile arts. 

img nagakura kenichi circle


img uematsu chikuyu ascending heaven



(Left) Nagakura Ken'ichi, Circle, 1990. Bamboo (madake), lacquer, powdered polishing stone, and clay. Photo by Mochizuki Akira.
(Right) Uematsu Chicuyū, Ascending to Heaven, 2007. Bamboo (madake) and rattan. Photo by Susan Einstein.

Bamboo is a quintessential part of Japanese life, and its emergence as a sculptural art form has religious and cultural roots. The Japanese have used this extraordinarily strong and flexible grass for centuries–for everything from functional objects to ceremonial baskets, and for the vases, tea scoops, ladles and whisks that serve an important place in the Japanese traditions of flower arranging (ikebana) and tea gatherings (chanoyu and senchadō). It is a challenging medium, with less than 100 professional bamboo artists in Japan today.

Modern Twist brings 17 of these artists to North American audiences, including two men deemed “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese government in recognition of the excellence of their work. These National Treasures–Katsushiro Sōhō and Fujinuma Noboru–are joined by visionary artists Matsumoto Hafū, Honma Hideaki, Ueno Masao, Uematsu Chikuyū, Nagakura Ken’ichi, Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Tanabe Yōta, Tanabe Shōchiku III, Tanioka Shigeo, Tanioka Aiko, Honda Shōryū, Mimura Chikuhō, Nakatomi Hajime, Sugiura Noriyoshi, and Yonezawa Jirō.

img tanabe chikuunsai iii-squares and circles

img jenny-tray







(Left) Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Squares and Circles, 2005. Bamboo (yadake), rattan, lacquer. Photo © Forrest Cavale.
(Right) Jenny Jackson, Pomo Indian Feast Tray, circa 1885. Willow shoots, sedge roots, bracken fern roots.

img bamboo exhibit


 img daen no kiseki rotation

(Left) Grace Hudson Museum Main Gallery, featuring Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art
(Right) Ueno Masao, Rotation of Ellipse Makes Two Transparent Drums, 2004. Bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer,
and gold powder. Photo by Susan Einstein.

It was a rare opportunity at the Grace Hudson Museum to experience groundbreaking levels of conceptual, technical, and artistic ingenuity both in bamboo art, and in the striking examples of our own local Pomo basketry.

The exhibition was generously supported by the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Nomura Foundation, Japan Foundation,
Los Angeles, and the Snider Family Fund.

iaa-fullcolorimg ccjac

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