EXHIBITS

Now Showing

Saturday, August 20, 2016–Sunday, November 27, 2016

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This multi-disciplinary contemporary art exhibit explores and celebrates the biology, beauty and bounty of the Pacific Flyway–the major north-south path for migratory birds from the Alaskan Arctic to South America. Focused particularly on the Flyway within California, the art installation by Sacramento-area artists Valerie Constantino, Glenda Drew and Ann Savageau is supplemented at the Grace Hudson Museum with bird specimens from the Lake Sonoma Visitors Center and the Hopland Research and Extension Center, and with bird-related pieces by the Museum's namesake artist, Grace Hudson.

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(Left) Ducks and Hunters Box
(Above)
Feather Print Wall
(Below) Wing Bone Box

All by Valerie Constantino,
Glenda Drew and Ann Savageau

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(Left) Instinct Extinct installed at the Grace Hudson Museum


Instinct Extinct
is a traveling exhibition from Exhibit Envoy,
funded by The James Irvine Foundation, and curated by Valerie Constantino, Glenda Drew and Ann Savageau. Local funding provided by Amy Neel and the Neel Family Foundation and the Sun House Guild.





Current Exhibit

Saturday, April 30, 2016–Sunday, July 31, 2016

She Sang Me a Good Luck Song: The California Indian Photographs of Dugan Aguilar

img headdress maidu dancerFilled with stunning photographs that reveal the richness and vibrancy of contemporary Native Californian cultures, this traveling exhibit features the work of Dugan Aguilar (Mountain Maidu/Washoe/Pit River/Walker River Paiute). From basket makers and dancers to military veterans and motorcyclists, his images provide an intimate look at the lives of current day California Indians. At the Grace Hudson Museum, Aguilar's photos will be supplemented with Native objects and regalia. She Sang Me a Good Luck Song: The California Indian Photographs of Dugan Aguilar is a partnership with Exhibit Envoy, Heyday Books, and the Native Fund, curated by Theresa Harlan and Dugan Aguilar.

Headdress, Maidu Dancer, c. 2004, Dugan Aguilar.

Exhibits

The Grace Hudson Museum has four exhibit galleries; three house permanent collections devoted to Grace Hudson's art; her family; and Pomo basketry. The fourth gallery is for the display of changing exhibits with a rotating emphasis on art, history, and anthropology. Changing exhibits generally are installed for three to four months. The Sun House, the Hudsons' historic Craftsman Home, is also available for tours.

Exhibition Schedule


Saturday, August 20, 2016–Sunday, November 27, 2016

img instinctextinct logo





img huntersducks


This multi-disciplinary exhibit explores and celebrates the biology, beauty, and bounty of the Pacific Flyway–the major north-south path for migratory birds from the Alaskan Arctic to South America. Focused particularly on the Flyway within California, the contemporary art installation by Sacramento-area artists Valerie Constantino, Glenda Drew, and Ann Savageau is supplemented at the Grace Hudson Museum with bird specimens from the Lake Sonoma Visitors Center and the Hopland Research and Extension Center, and with bird-related pieces by the Museum's namesake artist, Grace Hudson.

 Ducks and Hunters BoxValerie Constantino, Glenda Drew, and Ann Savageau



Saturday, December 10, 2016–March 12, 2017

They Came to Washington in 1821: The First Ambassadors

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In 1821, artist Charles Bird King was commissioned by Thomas McKenney, U.S. Superintendent of Indian Trade, to paint portraits of American Indian
tribal leaders visiting Washington D.C. to negotiate pressing issues with representatives of the American government. A fire later destroyed most of King's canvases, but an 1836 series of lithographs of his works survived. This exhibit includes almost 40 of these scarce prints and tells the stories of their distinguished subjects. Some of Grace Hudson's rare portraits of Pawnee Indians will also be on display, along with examples of Indian Peace Medals from the time period. This exhibit was organized by the Marin Museum of the American Indian.






 Saturday, March 25, 2017–Sunday, June 25, 2017

Wild Fabrications

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Wild Fabrications
celebrates a world of animals, both real and fantastic–brought to life through the vivid imagination of members of the national organization, Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA). The exhibit will feature 38 animal-inspired art quilts, created with unexpected materials, unusual adornment, and unconventional techniques. Traveled through SAQA.


 



Permanent Exhibits

Permanent exhibits on Grace Hudson's life, family, and professional work, and on Pomo basketry and culture, are available for viewing during regular Museum hours. The Sun House, the Hudsons' 1911 Craftsman home can be toured with Museum docents. See Sun House Tours for more information.

Hart Gallery

The Ivan B. and Elvira Hart Gallery houses a permanent exhibition dedicated to the artistic career of Grace Carpenter Hudson. Accompanied by text and photo panels giving extensive information about each phase and aspect of Grace's professional development, the gallery features numerous oils, watercolors, pen and ink drawings, charcoal, conte crayon, and graphite drawings, and mixed media works. Hudson's personal life is documented further in the Norma & Evert Person Gallery.

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Person Gallery

img person galThe Norma and Evert Person Gallery features a permanent exhibit of informative text panels, photographs, textiles, and objects that interpret the history, and celebrate the legacy, of the memorable Carpenter-Hudson family. Organized by generations, each section of the gallery introduces the viewer to members of Grace Carpenter Hudson's illustrious family through descriptions of their lives, and displays of their belongings. Grace's own section expands upon her personal life, while her professional career is highlighted in the Ivan B. and Elvira Hart Gallery.


 

Stone Gallery

"stone gallery" "pomo baskets"The J. Ralph and Lois Stone Gallery features a long-term exhibition showcasing Pomo baskety masterpieces woven between 1860-2003. The baskets come from the collections of the Grace Hudson Museum, other private institutions with significant ethnographic holdings, and private collections. Informative text panels explain the steps taken in cultivating, harvesting, and processing materials for basketmaking. Panels also discuss the history of Pomo basketweaving, and the forms and functions of various basket types.

The Sun House

A sunny day at The Sun House, Grace Hudson's historic home in Ukiah, California.The Sun House, a 1911 redwood Craftsman bungalow home, is situated immediately in front of the Museum and is available for tours from noon to 3 pm*. Grace and John Hudson, its owners, together with architect George Wilcox, set out to build a functional, custom Craftsman-style home scaled to the Hudsons' needs. Fairly modest in size, it nonetheless accommodated Grace's prodigious artistic output and John's sizeable ethnographic collections. Keeping in mind the Arts and Crafts goal of uniting designer and craftsperson, the Hudsons actively collaborated with Wilcox on the design of the house, while adding their own creative touches. These include the pink tulips that Grace stenciled on the bedroom walls, the distinctive hat rack built by John Hudson in the entryway, and the unusual pendant lighting fixtures throughout the home. As was often the case in Craftsman dwellings, the architect became the furniture maker as well, when Wilcox designed and built the beautiful sideboard in the dining room that he presented to the Hudsons as a housewarming present. It is believed they moved into the Sun House around New Year's Day, 1912.

While these personal touches make the Sun House unique (in keeping with the Arts and Crafts spirit), it also features many typical Craftsman details. The sloping gabled roof with overhang, the sleeping porch, the use of natural redwood and stone, the front veranda, board-and-batten walls, built-in cabinetry and window seats, curio shelves above the doorways, "honest" materials (such as burlap and monks cloth wall coverings), exposed timbers, and the home's overall sense of simplicity, are all classic Craftsman elements.

Though George Wilcox designed several other Craftsman homes in Ukiah, and a scattering of other Craftsman bungalows exist in the town, the Sun House remains its most famous example. This is in good part due, of course, to its distinctive inhabitants. Taken together, the Hudsons and the Sun House are the embodiment of Arts and Crafts ideals, and leave a local legacy of an international movement.

*NOTE: Due to construction taking place in and around our garden area, Sun House tours are very limited at this time. Please call ahead to confirm availability.

She Sang Me a Good Luck Song:

The California Indian Photographs of Dugan Aguilar

Saturday, April 30, 2016–Sunday, July 31, 2016

img headdress maidu dancerFilled with stunning photographs that revealed the richness and vibrancy of contemporary Native Californian cultures, this traveling exhibit featured the work of Dugan Aguilar (Mountain Maidu/Washoe/Pit River/Walker River Paiute). From basket makers and dancers to military veterans and motorcyclists, his images provided an intimate look at the lives of current day California Indians. At the Grace Hudson Museum, Aguilar's photos were supplemented with Native objects and regalia. She Sang Me a Good Luck Song: The California Indian Photographs of Dugan Aguilar is a partnership with Exhibit Envoy, Heyday Books, and the Native Fund, curated by Theresa Harlan and Dugan Aguilar.

(Above) Headdress, Maidu Dancer, c. 2004


(Below Left) Cousin Fred, Truckee, 1982; (Below Right) Maidu Singers, Bear Dance, 2009

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(Left) She Sang Me a
Good Luck Song
installed
in the Main Gallery

(Right) Mimi Mullen (Maidu),
Grand Marshal, Greenville Gold Digger Days Parade
, 1997







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